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Leishman goes “Wire-to-Wire” to Win the BMW Championship

Australian Marc Leishman stretched his four stroke 54-hole lead to a five shot win of the BMW Championship over Rickie Fowler and Justin Rose. Played at Conway Farms Golf Club near Chicago, this was the third of four FedExCup playoff tournaments. The 70 players with the most points were cut to the top-30 who move on to the Tour Championship at East Lake Golf Club outside Atlanta to vie for the $10 million FedExCup prize.

Leishman, who was in control all day has two previous wins on Tour, the most recent in March at the Arnold Palmer Invitational. Two weeks ago at the Dell Technologies Open, the second playoff event, he closed with a five over par score of 40 on the final nine allowing Justin Thomas to overtake him for the win.

Leishman is on the Callaway Golf endorsement staff and his bag has only two changes since the API win six months ago. He switched out a Great Big Bertha Epic 21-degree fairway wood for the same loft in a Steelhead XR model and has a new Mack Daddy Forged wedge.

Leishman’s Winning Gear

  • Driver: Callaway Great Big Bertha Epic 9 degrees loft (Fujikura Speeder 757 Evolution II X shaft)
  • Fairway woods: Callaway Great Big Bertha Epic 15-degrees loft and Callaway Steelhead XR 21-degrees loft (Fujikura Motore Speeder VC Tour Spec 9.2 X shafts)
  • Irons: 3-iron Callaway Apex Utility and 4-iron through pitching wedge Apex Pro 16 (Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 Tour 130X shafts)
  • Wedges: 54-degree loft Callaway Mack Daddy Forged and 58-degree loft Titleist Vokey Design SM6 (Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 Tour 120X shafts)
  • Putter: Odyssey Versa #1 Wide Black/White/Black
  • Ball: Callaway Chrome Soft X

NOTES

BMW by the Numbers: In the 70 player field (69 after Danny Lee withdrew in the first round), 29 were playing TaylorMade drivers, 16 with Callaway, Titleist 14 and Ping 6. The ball count saw Titleist with 44 and the nearest competitor had 11. Titleist Vokey Design wedges were also first with 90 and the most used putters were from Scotty Cameron with 28. In hybrids Titleist had the most with 10 and the greatest number of irons sets at 18.

In Case Anyone Should Ask: This is the third time in five years Conway Farms Golf Club is a venue for one of the FedExCup Playoff events. This week it played to a “medium” length of 7,233 yards and a par of 71. This event, formerly the Western Open,  is second to the U.S. Open as the oldest event on the PGA Tour having been started by the Western Golf Association in 1899. The last two winners at Conway Farms were Jason Day (2015) and Zach Johnson (2013) and in 2013, Jim Furyk recorded a 59 in the second round.

Ben Hogan: A reorganized Ben Hogan Golf Equipment Company is trying to return from bankruptcy with a new business plan selling only over the Internet with prices substantially lower than what were charged when their clubs were available at brick-and-mortar shops. A seven-iron set of the Hogan PTx model is now $770 and included are a free TK wedge and free shipping. When introduced in the spring of 2016 the price for the same set was $1,183.

PTx

KZG: The newest wedge from custom-only club maker KZG is the triple forged XSC model. Available in eight loft and lie combinations for right handers and three combinations for left handers, all are priced at $169 each.

KZG XSC Wedge

PXG v. TMaG: The Parsons Xtreme Golf suit claiming TaylorMade Golf’s P790 irons infringe on eight PXG patents included asking the court for a temporary restraining order to prevent sale of the irons. The restraining order was denied by the U.S. District Court on Friday Sept. 16 which might be construed as an early round victory for TaylorMade. However, on Sept. 15 and 16 PXG launched another tactic in pursuit of patent protection by bringing suit against Dick’s Sporting Goods, Worldwide Golf, PGA Tour Superstore and Golf Galaxy for retail sales of P790s. PXG does not sell through those retail outlets, only through authorized club fitters, but this suit raises the question of whether a purchaser of TMaG’s P790 irons could be liable should the irons ultimately be ruled in violation of PXG patents.

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