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May 28 — As any ardent “Seinfeld” follower well knows, hitting golf balls into the ocean is bad for whales. Smacking the little white orbs into the Gulf of Mexico, however, may end up helping the environment, as BP continues to struggle with its oil spill “top kill” plan to plug the worst oil spill in U.S. history.
Um, golf balls? Yup, those dimpled orbs you regularly dump into golf course hazards around the world.
The most trusted ball in golf. Now, sixteen years after Seinfeld’s George Costanza saved a whale’s life by plucking a Titleist from the mammal’s blow hole, BP resorted Wednesday to shooting golf balls and other pieces of junk such as tire shards into its deep-sea oil well to stop an environmental hazard of unmatched proportions.
The idea is to plug a busted blowout preventer and stop the massive oil leak that has fouled the Gulf Coast with more than five million gallons of oil, according to published reports.
The well has been dumping thousands of barrels of oil a day into the Gulf for more than a month, when the piece of equipment called a blowout preventer broke and Transocean Ltd.’s Deepwater Horizon oil-drilling rig exploded and sank. The disaster killed 11 workers.
The top kill procedure, which BP has yet to term a success since it began Wednesday, involves pumping thick fluids, or “drilling mud,” into the blowout preventer to halt the leak, according to Reuters.
Junk shot. Here’s where the golf balls come into play. BP began pumping golf balls and shreds of rubber into the gear Thursday but had yet to determine the result of its efforts.
Why golf balls? It seems that golf balls are small and robust enough to fill holes between the other crap, like rope and tires, that BP is using to plug the leak, according to Slate. After all, if a Titleist Pro V1 can stand up to a John Daly tee shot, it should certainly be able to plug an oil spill, right?
Apparently so. Slate.com noted that golf balls can withstand 2,000 pounds of force from a golf club.
Just add golf balls and stir. Click here to read Slate’s detailed and entertaining take on why golf balls make the perfect “junk shot” ingredient.
As of Friday, by the way, BP had not requested any products from Titleist, according to a spokesperson from Massachusetts-based Acushnet, which makes Titleist golf balls.

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